MONDO EXTRAS

Staff Flick Picks

by The Editors August 16, 2007
The Movies On Cable We Can't Resist

And if this seems like too much of a time commitment, you can always just tell yourself that you'll shut it off as soon as you get to a scene where Brad Pitt isn't eating something.

--M. Giant

I didn't see Broadcast News until long after it was already an Oscar nominee (and Oscar loser). I was in high school, a know-it-all asshole brat (a phase some would say I never quite outgrew), and identified so strongly with Holly Hunter's Jane Craig that I was actually a tiny bit creeped out that James L. Brooks had crafted the character after reading my diary. When I watch it again now -- and I do, often; whichever channel in your market always shows Terms Of Endearment is probably showing News this weekend -- I can, under duress, tear myself away before the end, but not before the brunch-party exchange when Jane's boss balefully snarks at her, "It must be nice to always believe you know better, to always think you're the smartest person in the room," and Jane soulfully replies, "No, it's awful."

The movie is also to be commended for creating crackling banter for Jane and her colleague Aaron Altman (Albert Brooks! Scorpio!), so rare in movies these days. That these characters can be so intellectually in sync, and not get together because she has a crush on Tom Grunick (William Hurt), a fatuous hairdo of an anchorman...the script is so good that every plot twist really is earned, which is what makes it all the more painful when Aaron predicts that he'll see Jane, years in the future, and have to tell his son not to stare at the fat lady, and to see the way this remark catches Jane so much by surprised that she physically flinches at it, seemingly involuntarily.

My one note on the movie: I know it was the '80s, and stuff, but if the point of the story is that Jane has to choose between the witty, slightly lumpy genius reporter (Aaron) and the dunderhead with nothing really going for him but his looks (Tom)...William Hurt? As the dreamboat? Really? Albert Brooks is cuter than Hurt any day of the week, and not just because he played the guy who was singing and reading both.

--Wing Chun

Whenever anyone wants to talk smack about misguided Academy voter, the 1952 Best Picture winner The Greatest Show On Earth gets dragged into the fray. Cecil B. DeMille's circus flick catches flack for being the weak sister in a year that produced Singing In The Rain, Sudden Fear, High Noon, and The Quiet Man. Yet I contend it has timeless, compelling qualities, chief among them epic fatuity.

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Staff Flick Picks

by The Editors August 16, 2007
The Movies On Cable We Can’t Resist And if this seems like too much of a time commitment, you can always just tell yourself that you'll shut it off as soon as you get to a scene where Brad Pitt isn't eating something. --M. Giant I didn't see Broadcast News until long after it was already an Oscar nominee (and Oscar loser). I was in high school, a know-it-all asshole brat (a phase some would say I never quite outgrew), and identified so strongly with Holly Hunter's Jane Craig that I was actually a tiny bit creeped out that James L. Brooks had crafted the character after reading my diary. When I watch it again now -- and I do, often; whichever channel in your market always shows Terms Of Endearment is probably showing News this weekend -- I can, under duress, tear myself away before the end, but not before the brunch-party exchange when Jane's boss balefully snarks at her, "It must be nice to always believe you know better, to always think you're the smartest person in the room," and Jane soulfully replies, "No, it's awful." The movie is also to be commended for creating crackling banter for Jane and her colleague Aaron Altman (Albert Brooks! Scorpio!), so rare in movies these days. That these characters can be so intellectually in sync, and not get together because she has a crush on Tom Grunick (William Hurt), a fatuous hairdo of an anchorman...the script is so good that every plot twist really is earned, which is what makes it all the more painful when Aaron predicts that he'll see Jane, years in the future, and have to tell his son not to stare at the fat lady, and to see the way this remark catches Jane so much by surprised that she physically flinches at it, seemingly involuntarily. My one note on the movie: I know it was the '80s, and stuff, but if the point of the story is that Jane has to choose between the witty, slightly lumpy genius reporter (Aaron) and the dunderhead with nothing really going for him but his looks (Tom)...William Hurt? As the dreamboat? Really? Albert Brooks is cuter than Hurt any day of the week, and not just because he played the guy who was singing and reading both. --Wing Chun Whenever anyone wants to talk smack about misguided Academy voter, the 1952 Best Picture winner The Greatest Show On Earth gets dragged into the fray. Cecil B. DeMille's circus flick catches flack for being the weak sister in a year that produced Singing In The Rain, Sudden Fear, High Noon, and The Quiet Man. Yet I contend it has timeless, compelling qualities, chief among them epic fatuity.

Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13Next

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